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Thread: looking for vintage cream cake recipe

  1. #1
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    Default looking for vintage cream cake recipe

    My Grandmother used to make a yellow cake with cream poured over it that was pure bliss. No one in the family knows the recipe. I remember she used condensed milk and vanilla but can't grasp whether or not it was made with eggs, maybe yolks because the cream came out like pudding that didn't completely set. She would put 3 layers of plain yellow cake in a huge wooden bowl and pour cream between each and over. The cake set in a bowl of (sort of) creamed pudding. When it was served you needed a spoon to get every drop or lick the plate . It's not cream in the cake like tres leches cake. Does anyone have a recipe for anything like this? She called it cream cake and I would love to make this for the family for Easter.

  2. #2
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    Nope, I was wrong. My Mother just told me it was made with pet milk (canned cream), not condensed milk. She thinks egg yolks, flour & sugar. Guess I thought condensed milk because it is sweet.

  3. #3
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    Aug 2009
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    Could it be a Boston Cream cake without chocolate frosting? I found this recipe:

    To print this page, use your browser's "print" button. Then click "back" to return to the site.

    BOSTON CREAM CAKE
    Printed from COOKS.COM
    CAKE:
    1 (18 1/2-ounce) pkg. yellow cake mix
    1 envelope whipped topping mix
    4 eggs
    1 c. cold water
    Combine all ingredients; using electric mixer, beat on low speed until ingredients are blended, then beat at medium speed for 4 minutes. Pour batter into 2 greased and floured 9 inch round baking pans. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes or until wooden pick inserted near center comes out clean. Cool.
    FILLING:
    1 c. sugar
    1/4 tsp. salt
    1/4 c. plus 1 tbsp. cornstarch
    3 1/2 c. milk
    3 eggs
    1 tsp. vanilla extract
    2 tbsp. butter
    Combine sugar, salt, cornstarch and milk in saucepan; cook over low heat until thickened, stirring frequently. Remove from heat. Add eggs and cook for 5 minutes. remove from heat. Beat in vanilla and butter. Remove cooled cake from pans. Using bread knife, cut layers in half. Assemble cake like a torte with filling between each layer.
    SAUCE:
    3 squares unsweetened baking chocolate
    1/2 c. milk
    3/4 c. sugar
    2 tbsp. butter
    Dash of salt
    3/4 tsp. vanilla extract
    Melt chocolate in small saucepan; add milk. Stir in sugar, butter and salt and cook over low heat until slightly thickened. Add vanilla and mix well. Cool. Pour sauce over assembled cake. Chill before serving.
    Yields: 12 to 20 servings.

  4. #4
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    It sounds almost like a trifle. Did she break up the cakes or put them in the bowl whole?
    Treat everyone with politeness, even those who are rude to you - not because they are nice, but because you are. ~Author Unknown



  5. #5
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    I have a number of recipes for "pudding cakes" most of them are chocolate but you can make them without it. I will try to look them up, pretty much they make their own "pudding" and you eat them out of a bowl. When I was a child it was one of my favorite cakes, but I've never managed a non-chocolate one I really liked and since I can only eat very limited amounts of the stuff I've just been using DH favorite family cake recipe when I make a chocolate cake these days.

    But I'll take a look because this does sound a lot like a pudding cake. There's a similar trick with eggs and milk/cream that can make a two layer savory corn bread.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  6. #6
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    It's not boston cream and she didn't crumble it but I suppose it's along that line but only cake and cream. It was always in a huge bowl because there was lots of the cream so when you spooned out a piece of the cake you also spooned out a lot of the cream. Like eating cake in cream. DC very interested in your recipe when you have the time & the corn bread too. I've got my whole family buzing about this so hopefully we'll all remember bits and pieces and put it together. I'm experimenting with what my Mother and I can remember. Thanks. MM

  7. #7
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    If it looked like white cream, it was probably not a pudding cake but if it was more or less yellow, like the cake/batter is may be. I'll try to get out my recipe books later and see if I can find this, I know I have a version of the corn bread in at least two different books.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  8. #8
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    Maddymae, my grandmother made one that was a yellow cake, broken into big chunks, then layered (in a bowl) with a thick custard sauce. That's what she called a trifle.

    I don't have her recipe, though, and my mother never made it, so I assume she didn't either. I'm looking forward to Disastercat's.
    Treat everyone with politeness, even those who are rude to you - not because they are nice, but because you are. ~Author Unknown



  9. #9
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    Sounds to me like a Trifle (punchbowl cake, tipsy pudding). Sounds like your Grandmother substituted evaporated milk for the half and half as many of her contemporaries did because it was much cheaper than fresh light cream.

    I made one the other day. It is basically cake (lady fingers, pound cake or sponge cake) layered with boiled custard and whipped cream. Older recipes call for the cake to be sprinkled with sherry but it is just as good without.

    You need cake, cooled boiled custard and whipped cream.

    Boiled Custard

    1 quart half and half
    1/2 cup superfine sugar
    5 eggs
    2 tsp REAL vanilla extract.

    In the top of a double boiler over simmering water, heat the half and half until moderately hot. In a separate bowl, whisk the eggs with the sugar until uniform in color and sugar is dissolved ( don't 'beat' them or use a blender or mixer as it will incorporate too much air).

    When the half and half is hot, ladle about a cup of it into the eggs, whisking as you go to 'temper' the eggs. (This keeps them from 'scrambling' when added to the hot milk) Pour the tempered egg mixture into the top of the double boiler with the remaining half and half. Cook over the simmering water, whisking or stirring gently the whole time, until the mixture thickens and coats the back of a spoon, about 15 minutes. (when you put the spoon in and take it out, you can drag your finger across the back of it and the custard will stay coating the spoon bowl and leave a clean edge where you dragged your finger).

    Remove the top of the double boiler from the bottom and set aside. Mix in the vanilla. Allow to cool, whisking every once in a while. If you want to speed up cooling, you can put the double boiler top in a big bowl of ice and stir the sdges to the middle until it is cold.

    Assemble the trifle by layering thinly sliced cake and custard in a pretty glass bowl. Add a layer of lightly sweetened whipped cream about midway up. continue layering and top with whipped cream.

    Prepare the day before serving and refrigerate to allow the custard to soak into the cake some.

    You can also make it the 'cheater's way' (LOL) with cake, thinner than normal instant vanilla pudding and Cool Whip, but in a side by side comparison, I would pick the scratchmade EVERY time. It is a little trouble to make but the results are "died and went to heaven" GOOD.
    Last edited by AngelDance; 02-22-2011 at 12:34 PM. Reason: Add a line
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  10. #10
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    It almost sounds like bread pudding the way my grandmother made hers. Boy, talk about Yummy!!! I make it every once in a while, but I cringe when I think about the calories in each bite. DC we will look forward to your recipe. AL

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