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Thread: evaporated milk substitute recipe

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Mississippi
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    2,507

    Default evaporated milk substitute recipe

    I just tried a substitute recipe for evaporated milk in some pumpkin pies and we couldn't tell the difference, no alteration in taste or texture.

    DH had just brought home some of those little cans of evap milk for about $1.09 ea and I am guessing here, but figure it cost me about 25cents to make it.
    I did notice it was not as thick as the canned and will use a tad less water next time and see how that works, but I just added some extra time for the pies to cook.
    I came here to give my results and thank you's and don't see the recipe posted or found under a search, sooo, who knows where I copied it from, I sure do that alot lately, lol

    here it is for anyone interested,

    Evaporated Milk substitute recipe

    Ingredients
    Equal to 1 cup:

    2/3 cup dry milk powder
    3/4 cup water

    Equal to 1 (12 oz.) can:
    1 1/4 c. water
    1 c. dry milk
    Directions

    Mix together.
    Last edited by luvmyvet; 11-19-2011 at 05:47 PM. Reason: added a word

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Possum Hollow, KY
    Posts
    4,979

    Default

    Thank you!!!
    Treat everyone with politeness, even those who are rude to you - not because they are nice, but because you are. ~Author Unknown



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Willamette Valley, Oregon
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    Default

    Wouldn't this only work for the non fat evaporated milk.

    Most of the fun of evaporated milk is just how fattening it is. I swear that I would drink it like water if it didn't have so many calories, and wasn't so expensive.


  4. #4
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    Oct 2009
    Location
    Mississippi
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    NS,

    I don't buy the nonfat milk, what fun is that?
    I want calories with my treats!

    honestly, we could not tell the difference and where ever it was that I copied this recipe from, the poster said she also uses the recipe when she needs to use heavy cream and doesn't have any.

    I plan to make some banana cream pies tommorow (one of my fave pie's) and will give a review on the taste test, but I was quite pleased and relieved with the way the pumpkin pies turned out using dried milk from storage.
    I am happy to know dried milk can be used if need be with good results.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Mississippi
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    Default

    back with taste test results from the Banana Cream pies made with using the substitute evap milk recipe as the "cream"..

    they were delicious, had good texture and tasted rich and oh so fattening,
    and I got to cut my costs on pumpkin and cream pies to bare minimum without loss of flavor. That sure helps at this time of year when I love to bake and share with others.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    l.a.(lower Arkansas)
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luvmyvet View Post
    That sure helps at this time of year when I love to bake and share with others.

    Hmm, just how close to the Arkansas state line are ya?



    My mama always just uses plain milk for her cream pies, mainly chocolate and coconut. Are you saying the flavor is even better to use pet milk? Cause I didn't think there was anything in the world better than her coconut pie.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Mississippi
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    CVOR,

    we are not that far from the state line, lol


    but no, not evap milk for the cream pies, I normally would use goats milk which is high in butterfat and or whole cow's or half/half.

    The poster who shared the recipe posted that she also uses the dried milk evap recipe as a substitute for heavy cream.
    So, I decided to try it in a broccoli/cheese quiche last week and it was also quite good.

    Our goats are dried up at the moment waiting on babies, so for now we have to buy from the store,
    we sure get spoiled having own milk supply, lol

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
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    Evaporated milk and powdered milk both work in pumpkin pies because they are pre-cooked (or heat treated), the powdered milk won't taste quite a "rich" as evaporated milk but in a rich, pumpkin-custard pie with eggs; it is hard to tell much difference.

    This is the same reason that powdered milk works so well in breads and rolls; because the stuff is heat treated already. Most older cookbooks start their bread recipes with "scald the milk, then add sugar/honey and butter to hot mixture" then "allow to cool to lukewarm and add the yeast." Many "modern" recipes omit this step, especially books for bread bakers; there is nothing harmful in using cold and unheated milk in your bread, but I gather that something in the milk breaks down when it is heated to the scalding point and just blends with the dough better. In my experience heated milk breads and/or breads using canned, powdered or butter milk rise better than those made with store bought, unheated milk from the fridge.

    I have made really good bread from unheated goat's milk, but it isn't quite the same as cow's milk.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    560

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    You need to scald the milk if it is raw. There's something in the raw milk that interferes with the gluten in the flour. Mother told me what but I forgot. She said that if you're using pasteurized milk the heating step has already been done. The raw unscalded milk tends to make bread gummy.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    1,294

    Default

    Didn't know that. Thnx.


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