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Thread: Depression Era Cooking.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    6,365

    Thumbs up Depression Era Cooking.

    I wanted to get a thread started on this based on what was suggested already in the CoC. Not taking glory from the OP who suggested it, I just have the time to start the thread and hopefully get others to start contributing.

    Here's some links - some have YouTub3! video's linked in.

    (A lot of these sites are trying to sell something - imagine that!)

    http://greatdepressioncooking.com/Welcome.html

    http://community.tasteofhome.com/com...0/t/44025.aspx


    That'll get us started. Thanks everyone/anyone that contributes!

  2. #2
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    Mar 2010
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    Vintage WW1 Eggless, Milkless, Butterless Cake

    1 cup water
    2 cups raisins
    1 tsp. cinnamon
    1/2 tsp. cloves
    1 cup brown sugar
    1/3 cup lard (shortening)
    1/4 tsp. nutmeg
    1/4 tsp. salt
    2 cups flour
    1 tsp. baking soda
    1/2 tsp. baking powder

    Place water, raisins, cinnamon, cloves, brown sugar, lard (shortening), nutmeg and salt in a saucepan and mix. Place on heat and bring to a boil. Cook 3 minutes. Allow to cool, then sift together the flour, baking soda and baking
    powder. Stir into cooked mixture.
    Place in a greased loaf pan and bake at 350F for one hour.

  3. #3
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    Mar 2010
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    Ritz Mock Apple Pie

    The classic pie, featuring Ritz crackers baked in a golden crust, is perfect for the holidays.

    Pastry for two-crust 9-inch pie
    36 RITZ Crackers, coarsely broken (about 1 3/4 cups crumbs)
    1 3/4 cups water
    2 cups sugar
    2 teaspoons cream of tartar
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    Grated peel of one lemon
    2 tablespoons margarine or butter
    1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

    Roll out half the pastry and line a 9-inch pie plate. Place cracker crumbs in prepared crust; set aside.

    Heat water, sugar and cream of tartar to a boil in saucepan over high heat; simmer for 15 minutes. Add lemon juice and peel; cool.

    Pour syrup over cracker crumbs. Dot with margarine or butter; sprinkle with cinnamon. Roll out remaining pastry; place over pie. Trim, seal and flute edges. Slit top crust to allow steam to escape.

    Bake at 425F for 30 to 35 minutes or until crust is crisp and golden. Cool completely.

  4. #4
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    Mar 2010
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    Crazy Cake.
    My mom used to make this a olot for us kinds, her mom used to make it for her family.

    3 cups all-purpose flour
    2 cups white sugar
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 teaspoons baking soda
    1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
    3/4 cup vegetable oil
    2 tablespoons distilled white vinegar
    2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    2 cups cold water
    Directions
    1Sift flour, sugar, salt, soda, and cocoa together into a 9 x 13 inch ungreased cake pan. Make three wells. Pour oil into one well, vinegar into second, and vanilla into third well. Pour cold water over all, and stir well with fork.Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 30 to 40 minutes, or until tooth pick inserted comes out clean.

  5. #5
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    Mar 2010
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    we still make this in our family-
    Scalloped Corn
    1 can cream corn
    1 egg
    1/4 cup milk
    enough crumbled saltin cracker to make a semi-thick mixture when stirred into the above.
    Bake at 350 for about 30 min till nice and puffy

  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Heck - we're already doing some of these now. Keeping it basic means little to no change to adjust to when things go South.

    http://jjackson786.hubpages.com/hub/...n-In-Frugality

  8. #8
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    19,244

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    SOUP!! Lots and lots of soup!! (And then biscuits, or bread sticks or homemade crackers to fill in the cracks)

    Potato soup, made with whole milk, sauteed onions, chopped celery (this is a good place to use dehydrated celery and onions if you have them to use up) and salt and pepper is a great cold winter lunch or supper.

    You can make a great cream of potato soup with leftover mashed potatoes, too.

    Leftover mashed potato soup

    For every 1 cup of mashed potatoes, you need 1 large onion, 1 tablespoon of butter, 1/2 cup each of chicken stock and light cream or rich milk (can use evaporated milk in a pinch, or reconstituted dry milk powder, made up just a little "stronger" than you would for drinking)

    Slice the onion and saute them in the butter until limp, but not brown. Add the chicken stock, cover and simmer for 15 minutes- until the onions are very soft. Place the onion mixture in the blender with the mashed potatoes and the cream or milk. Blend until smooth, adding extra cream or milk as needed to get the desired consistency. (if you're doing a large amount, you'll have to do this in several batches)

    Return to the pan and reheat- salt and pepper to taste.

    If you have it, sprinkling each serving with shredded cheddar or mozzarella cheese can turn it into a "fancier" meal.

    I rarely use a recipe to make soup any more. I start with a good stock (homemade from a leftover poultry carcass, beef soup bones or a bunch of vegetable trimmings. I do keep assorted soup stock bases on hand to help an insipid or weak stock, though). Then I toss in whatever sounds good, plus leftovers from the fridge. You have to use your head about timing- if you want to use dry beans in the soup, they have to be added first, and simmered in the stock until almost tender. Add fresh veggies about 30 minutes before serving, and cooked veggies or leftovers and pasta about 10 minutes before serving. Always taste and season to taste...

    If you have a choice, ALWAYS brown the meat and bones you're using for a base- it gives a much richer flavor. And always remove most of the fat... a tiny bit left adds flavor- too much (more than a few rich golden "bubbles" of chicken fat on top, for example) just tastes greasy. Hubby only ate my homemade soup reluctantly when we first married, because his memories of his mom's soups weren't good- she always just tossed everything into the soup pot raw, boiled it to death, never skimmed any fat off, and never seasoned with anything except a bit of salt. The plants next to the kitchen door got watered with soup frequently, I'm told!

    Summerthyme

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
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    Taste of Home Depression Era Recipes

    http://community.tasteofhome.com/com...0/t/44025.aspx

    (opps! That one is listed. Sorry!)

    Here's a cookbook I have:


    Depression Era Recipes [Hardcover]
    Patricia R. Wagner (Author)

    http://www.amazon.com/Depression-Era...n+era+cookbook

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