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Thread: Homemade soups?

  1. #11
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    Chicken noodle is SO easy. And, in tight times, you can make it with the leftover bones- yes, even those people nibbled on! (if you know you want to make soup, cut the meat off the bones before serving... but it's going to be simmered for a few hours- you aren't going to spread germs, I promise)

    I often use a turkey carcass, which is wonderful, but all you need is a handful of chicken bones (and the skin, if possible), or a few leg quarters or whatever part is cheapest. Toss them in a kettle with some celery (use the leaves you don't eat for soup) an onion and a well scrubbed carrot- cut the onion and carrot into chunks. Add salt to taste (I used seasoned salt- I'll have to see if I've posted the recipe here for my "clone" of Lawry's) and simmer for at least a couple hours.

    Strain it all, and return the broth to the pot. This is where you add any veggies you have... Onions, celery and carrots- cut up into serving sized pieces are the basics. Then you can add anything from leftover potatoes, cut into bites sized chunks, to leftover veggies in the fridge (bits of green beans or corn- probably not stuff in the cabbage family). Bring back to a boil, and simmer 30-45 minutes until the vegetables are tender. The last 10 minutes, toss in some uncooked noodles or rice. Taste and add salt if needed, and pepper.

    Always add any pan drippings from when you cooked the chicken!

    If there is a lot of fat (1/8th inch or more deep) on top of the broth after you strain it, skim it off somehow before adding your veggies. Some fat is necessary for flavor and "mouthfeel", but too much is... well, too much! Hubby's mother never skimmed her soup (and never browned or otherwise did anything except boil raw meat in it) and let's just say the plants outside the kitchen windows were the recipients of many a bowl as the kids were growing up. The first time I made homemade soup as a young bride, hubby was less than enthusiastic until he tasted it! LOL!

    Summerthyme

  2. #12
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    Thanks for this thread. As the weather cools down soup is one of my favorites.

  3. #13
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    Thanks huny, the second link is still free, the first is 2.99, still a good price, imo.

  4. #14
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    I love homemade soup. (hubby not so much unless he is starving). Does anyone have an old fashion recipe for pork soup (using the roast bones leftover? My grandmother made the best in the world. It had a tomato base but not a strong tomato flavor. She was a magnificent person and fed all 13 of us and her mother & mIL through the war. I by the grace of GOD was raised the first 6 years by her and grandpa. The salt of the earth. I have tried and tried and I cannot duplicate it. I make a really wonderful variety of soups but not that one. PLEASE if you know, I would appreciate it.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summerthyme View Post
    Chicken noodle is SO easy. And, in tight times, you can make it with the leftover bones- yes, even those people nibbled on! (if you know you want to make soup, cut the meat off the bones before serving... but it's going to be simmered for a few hours- you aren't going to spread germs, I promise)

    I often use a turkey carcass, which is wonderful, but all you need is a handful of chicken bones (and the skin, if possible), or a few leg quarters or whatever part is cheapest. Toss them in a kettle with some celery (use the leaves you don't eat for soup) an onion and a well scrubbed carrot- cut the onion and carrot into chunks. Add salt to taste (I used seasoned salt- I'll have to see if I've posted the recipe here for my "clone" of Lawry's) and simmer for at least a couple hours.

    Strain it all, and return the broth to the pot. This is where you add any veggies you have... Onions, celery and carrots- cut up into serving sized pieces are the basics. Then you can add anything from leftover potatoes, cut into bites sized chunks, to leftover veggies in the fridge (bits of green beans or corn- probably not stuff in the cabbage family). Bring back to a boil, and simmer 30-45 minutes until the vegetables are tender. The last 10 minutes, toss in some uncooked noodles or rice. Taste and add salt if needed, and pepper.

    Always add any pan drippings from when you cooked the chicken!

    If there is a lot of fat (1/8th inch or more deep) on top of the broth after you strain it, skim it off somehow before adding your veggies. Some fat is necessary for flavor and "mouthfeel", but too much is... well, too much! Hubby's mother never skimmed her soup (and never browned or otherwise did anything except boil raw meat in it) and let's just say the plants outside the kitchen windows were the recipients of many a bowl as the kids were growing up. The first time I made homemade soup as a young bride, hubby was less than enthusiastic until he tasted it! LOL!

    Summerthyme
    Dang, I'm just drooling.

    A bloop or two of dry white wine kicks it up yet another notch. Put some in the soup, too!
    All best,
    Cyberiot

    Never try to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig. –Robert Heinlein

  6. #16
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    I just made an easy Potato Corn Soup from Left over Potatoes

    1. Take left over potatoes and mash them up...add milk and stir in pan over low/medium heat
    2. saute some onions if you like, with some celery and thinly sliced carrots or scallions
    3. use some browned hamburger, bacon or ham too if left over
    4 throw in a can of corn...

    Heat and serve...yum...top with some cheese, sour cream, etc...
    "Some stories are true that never happened"
    -- Eli Wiesel

  7. #17
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    This is great...I've "simmered the carcass" and it is the best flavor broth and super health from the bones...I sometimes add a tinch of orgeno oil and fresh garlic...that's for the "medicinal purposes" if anyone is sick.. can always add dumplings too if that's your thing...I love soups...filling, easy, hearty, comfort food and it is cheap easy and good for you...
    "Some stories are true that never happened"
    -- Eli Wiesel

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Animal Lover View Post
    I love homemade soup. (hubby not so much unless he is starving). Does anyone have an old fashion recipe for pork soup (using the roast bones leftover? My grandmother made the best in the world. It had a tomato base but not a strong tomato flavor. She was a magnificent person and fed all 13 of us and her mother & mIL through the war. I by the grace of GOD was raised the first 6 years by her and grandpa. The salt of the earth. I have tried and tried and I cannot duplicate it. I make a really wonderful variety of soups but not that one. PLEASE if you know, I would appreciate it.
    Don't know how your grandmother made her soup, but a tomato base I use for many of my soups is this:

    Put a tablespoon of olive oil in a cast-iron pan. Dice up a small onion and cook it in the oil until it becomes transparent. Dice up a couple cloves of fresh garlic and cook it with the onion for a minute or two until it becomes fragrant. Open a can or two of whole tomatoes and pour in the pan. Mash up the tomatoes as they cook. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes.

    At this point, you add this tomato sauce into the pot of whatever else you're cooking, along with about 1/3 stick of butter. Season to taste and simmer the whole mess for about an hour.
    IF you are willing & obedient , you shall eat the good of the land: But if you refuse & rebel, You shall be devoured with the sword: for the mouth of the LORD hath spoken it. Isaiah 1:19, 20

  9. #19
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    Beef Barley and Mushroom soup is one of our favorites. I like this one.


    Mushroom Barley Soup with Flanken
    ________________________

    "I shall not be a victim. I shall not be a perpetrator. Above all, I shall not be a bystander."

  10. #20
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    I have two packets of beef soup bones with a dallop of vinegar in them (to help release the bone minerals into the broth) sitting on our wood stove as I type....... ;o)

    Hallelujah!
    Jesus, you have overcome the World!

    Every high place must come down,
    Every stronghold shall be broken,
    You wear the Victor's Crown!
    You've overcome!
    You've overcome!


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