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Thread: What the January 6th Hearings Are Really About

  1. #101
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    Pat Cipollone is 'a greatest hits package of crazy statements' by Donald Trump: legal expert

    https://www.rawstory.com/pat-cipollo...zy-statements/


    Sarah K. BurrisJuly 06, 2022

    Former White House Counsel Pat Cipollone has agreed to speak to the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on Congress on Friday.

    Former Assistant Deputy Attorney General Harry Litman told CNN that Cipollone has carefully negotiated the testimony and he will likely "steer around down the middle" of the attorney/client privilege. However, former President Donald Trump is not the client of a White House counsel, the White House is. President Joe Biden has waived executive privilege for anything involving Jan. 6 or the 2020 election.

    "He is a greatest hits package of crazy statements by Donald Trump," Litman said of Cipollone. "He is the one who says to Mark Meadows, 'You know, if you do this, you'll have blood on your effing hands.' He's the one who says to Mark Meadows about [Mike] Pence, 'You've got to stop it' and Meadows says, 'You've heard him. He thinks the rioters are right.' He's the one who has to go to Cassidy Hutchinson, a 25-year-old, and plead with her because Meadows won't speak to him. 'Please try to keep him from going to the Capitol.' He's the one who says, 'if I go to the Capitol, it will be every effing crime imaginable.'"

    "Now, they've negotiated it up, and probably what he wants is to say he's not piercing attorney/client privilege. But all these statements I've said to you, Trump's nowhere around. So, attorney/client has to be with the client for the purpose of getting legal advice, so he's got tons to say without that."

    As Litman explained, Cipollone is in "everything."






  2. #102
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    The Jan. 6 panel announces its next hearing. Here's what we know from them so far

    Updated July 5, 2022
    5:47 PM ET

    DOMENICO MONTANARO

    https://www.npr.org/2022/07/05/1109461884/5-things-weve-learned-so-far-from-the-jan-6-committee-hearings

    The Jan. 6 committee has now held half a dozen hearings and are promising at least two more some time this month.

    The next, announced Monday, is scheduled for July 12 at 10 a.m. ET. It will focus on the rioters and mob who stormed the Capitol, Rep. Adam Schiff, a Democratic committee member, recently said, and it'll look at far-right groups such as the Proud Boys and the "efforts to assemble" them on Jan. 6, such as providing financing.

    Publicly, including in ad-libbed portions of his speech on Jan. 6, Trump has said multiple times that Pence didn't have the "courage" to do what he wanted. At a recent rally, Trump derided Pence as a "conveyor belt."

    Trump wrongly accused Georgia election worker Shaye Moss of altering votes because of a video he irresponsibly talked about.

    She testified that her personal life had been ruined since.

    "I've gained about 60 pounds. I just don't do nothing anymore," Moss said. "I don't want to go anywhere. I second guess everything that I do. It's affected my life in a — in a major way. In every way. All because of lies. For me doing my job, same thing I've been doing forever."

    4. The potential for criminal prosecution may be growing.

    A scheme for fake electors. Knowledge of the potential for violence. The lack of caring about that violence.

    A White House lawyer concerned about potential obstruction of Congress and defrauding the country charges.

    Members of Congress and others inside Trump's inner circle asking for pardons.
    And now oblique threats against committee witnesses.

    "I think most Americans know that attempting to influence witnesses to testify untruthfully presents very serious concerns," Committee Vice Chair Liz Cheney, R-Wyo. said.

    The committee is leaving lots of bread crumbs for prosecutors to peck at.

    5. The credibility of the witnesses is hard to dismiss.

    As much as Trump World is trying to undermine some of the testimony, particularly that of Hutchinson, ask yourself whether Hutchinson had more to gain or lose through her testimony and whether any of those, including the president, who are casting doubt on her testimony will do so under oath before the committee and the FBI.

    We've seen on lots of occasions when Trump has sat for depositions under oath, he has had a very different tune than in public. Almost everyone who has testified has been a Republican, who worked for Trump, was trying to get him reelected or voted for him.

    The conspiracy has to run pretty deep for them all to be lying or have an ax to grind.

    2. A president with a flash temper and desperate to hold onto power.

    Throwing plates at the wall because he was upset that his attorney general said there was no widespread fraud in the 2020 election.

    Grabbing the steering wheel of a presidential vehicle, because he so badly wanted to go to the Capitol with the rioters.

    Hutchinson painted a picture of a president unhinged. This isn't the first time people around Trump have described a man with a temper who demanded fealty.

    Multiple witnesses during these hearings have described a president who couldn't accept the truth, would find people to tell him what he wanted to hear, had descended down a deep rabbit hole of conspiracy and was willing to do whatever it took in a desperate effort to cling to power that was slipping through his fingers.

    3. No one was too big or too small for Trump's pressure campaign.

    From as high up as his former vice president Mike Pence all the way down to GOP state elections officials and election workers, no one was spared from Trump's persistent goading.

    "You heard him, Pat. He thinks Mike deserves it," Meadows told White House lawyer Pat Cipollone, per Hutchinson, about the crowd chanting, "Hang, Mike Pence!"

    (Cipollone may himself be compelled to testify soon. The committee has subpoenaed him.)

    Given the pause this week, we figured it's a good time to reflect on what we've learned so far. Here are five takeaways:

    1. For Trump, the crowd was armed, dangerous – and welcome.

    The former president knew the crowd had weapons, knew of the intelligence that violence could come on Jan. 6, but according to a White House aide, he didn't care.
    Why?

    "They're not here to hurt me," he said, per Cassidy Hutchinson, former aide to Trump Chief of Staff Mark Meadows. "Take the effing mags away. Let my people in. They can march to the Capitol from here."

    Hutchinson said Trump was "furious" that people who were armed on Jan. 6 were deterred by metal detectors, or magnetometers, and thereby making his crowd appear smaller.










  3. #103
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    All this "OPINIONS" are going to be "Contradicted", "Withdrawn" when they are called in front of a Jim Jordan run investigation. And I expect many will face "Lying under Oath" charges being requested during a "real investigation"!!!

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    Give it up, Green Man. Do you really think the good people of America are as gullible as you seem to think?

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    Tuesday’s session, set for 1 p.m., is expected to document how, after Mr. Trump’s many efforts to overturn the 2020 election had failed, he and his allies turned to violent far-right extremist groups whose support Mr. Trump had long cultivated, who in turn began assembling a mob to pressure Congress to reject the will of the voters.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/11/us/jamie-raskin-jan-6-hearing.html?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Green Man View Post
    Tuesday’s session, set for 1 p.m., is expected to document how, after Mr. Trump’s many efforts to overturn the 2020 election had failed, he and his allies turned to violent far-right extremist groups whose support Mr. Trump had long cultivated, who in turn began assembling a mob to pressure Congress to reject the will of the voters.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/11/us/jamie-raskin-jan-6-hearing.html?
    You still buying what they are selling, when DEMOCATS have been caught 'LYING" constantly!!!

    And ignore the real "CRIMINAL" in the White House!!!

  7. #107
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    When it comes to data on your phone, deleting a text isn't the end of the story

    Secret Service erased texts from two-day period spanning Jan. 6 attack, watchdog says

    July 15, 2022

    DUSTIN JONES

    https://www.npr.org/2022/07/15/1111778878/secret-service-deleted-messages-january-6-is-that-data-really-gone

    Texts and other electronic messages from the U.S. Secret Service have become a point a controversy after the Department of Homeland Security's inspector general told Congress that those records were deleted after his office had requested them. But can a text or other digital messages ever truly be erased from existence?

    People delete text messages and other electronic messages for many reasons: to free up room on their device; to break contact after a sour conversation; and, from time to time, to wipe out a conversation, for one reason or another.

    But deleting a digital correspondence isn't as easy as you might think. For starters, depending on the program you're using, the recipient still has a copy of the message you sent them. And that data might live on in cloud storage.

    Alfred Demirjian, founder and CEO of TechFusion, has spent the past 35 years in digital forensics and data recovery in Boston. He said that once you hit send, that information will likely exist forever, especially if the government wants whatever you've sent.

    "My theory — and I believe I am right — anything digital gets recorded; you text anything, it gets recorded somewhere," Demirjian said. "If it's for national security, they will open it up, if they want it, they will find it."

    When you delete a piece of data from your device — a photo, video, text or document — it doesn't vanish. Instead, your device labels that space as available to be overridden by new information.
    Digital investigators trained to sniff out deleted data use a method called jailbreaking to retrieve information from computers, iPhones, Androids and other devices.

    Once the memory on that device fills up entirely, new information is saved on top of those deleted items. Which could be good for those who take loads of innocent photos and videos. Those larger files overwrite old texts, photos and so on.

    "When you delete something, it doesn't erase it, it basically makes it available for the system to copy on top of it," Demirjian said.

    But these days, phones, computers and tablets come with larger and larger storage. Which means the odds of you filling up that device before having to clean house, is less likely, improving the odds of an investigator recovering that data.

    Even if an individual has maxed out their memory time and time again, investigators may still be able to retrieve deleted items.

    "Even if it is overwritten, it is still recoverable, but not everything," Demirjian said. "It takes a very long time and its very expensive, but some things are recoverable."

    If a person is desperate to wipe their device, they can have it professionally erased, Demirjian said, but it can be costly. Which may be why some resort to extreme measures to destroy digital evidence.

    People have tried bashing their phone with a hammer and throwing laptops into the ocean, but even then, a skilled digital forensics specialist could likely recover what they need. Burning a device into a molten pile of plastic, however, tends to do the trick.

    Demirjian has done work for NASA, IBM, Harvard and MIT, police organizations, the Department of Transportation and more. And though he considers himself an expert in digital forensics, he says some government agencies have access to data recovery tools that even he doesn't have.

    That being the case, Demirjian said it's best to practice being "politically correct," if sending something questionable.

    "Don't write something that you're going to be sorry about later if someone brings it up to you," he said.

  8. #108
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    Give it up greenman you have a dementia riddled pedophile in charge and hardly anyone is watching these hearings.


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    They swore, if we gave them our weapons, that the wars of the tribes would cease.
    “As a general rule, the earlier you recognize someone is trying to kill you, the better off you’ll be.”

    "You think a wall as solid as the earth separates civilisation from barbarism. I tell you the division is a sheet of glass."



  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Green Man View Post
    When it comes to data on your phone, deleting a text isn't the end of the story

    Secret Service erased texts from two-day period spanning Jan. 6 attack, watchdog says

    July 15, 2022

    DUSTIN JONES

    https://www.npr.org/2022/07/15/1111778878/secret-service-deleted-messages-january-6-is-that-data-really-gone

    Texts and other electronic messages from the U.S. Secret Service have become a point a controversy after the Department of Homeland Security's inspector general told Congress that those records were deleted after his office had requested them. But can a text or other digital messages ever truly be erased from existence?

    People delete text messages and other electronic messages for many reasons: to free up room on their device; to break contact after a sour conversation; and, from time to time, to wipe out a conversation, for one reason or another.

    But deleting a digital correspondence isn't as easy as you might think. For starters, depending on the program you're using, the recipient still has a copy of the message you sent them. And that data might live on in cloud storage.

    Alfred Demirjian, founder and CEO of TechFusion, has spent the past 35 years in digital forensics and data recovery in Boston. He said that once you hit send, that information will likely exist forever, especially if the government wants whatever you've sent.

    "My theory — and I believe I am right — anything digital gets recorded; you text anything, it gets recorded somewhere," Demirjian said. "If it's for national security, they will open it up, if they want it, they will find it."

    When you delete a piece of data from your device — a photo, video, text or document — it doesn't vanish. Instead, your device labels that space as available to be overridden by new information.
    Digital investigators trained to sniff out deleted data use a method called jailbreaking to retrieve information from computers, iPhones, Androids and other devices.

    Once the memory on that device fills up entirely, new information is saved on top of those deleted items. Which could be good for those who take loads of innocent photos and videos. Those larger files overwrite old texts, photos and so on.

    "When you delete something, it doesn't erase it, it basically makes it available for the system to copy on top of it," Demirjian said.

    But these days, phones, computers and tablets come with larger and larger storage. Which means the odds of you filling up that device before having to clean house, is less likely, improving the odds of an investigator recovering that data.

    Even if an individual has maxed out their memory time and time again, investigators may still be able to retrieve deleted items.

    "Even if it is overwritten, it is still recoverable, but not everything," Demirjian said. "It takes a very long time and its very expensive, but some things are recoverable."

    If a person is desperate to wipe their device, they can have it professionally erased, Demirjian said, but it can be costly. Which may be why some resort to extreme measures to destroy digital evidence.

    People have tried bashing their phone with a hammer and throwing laptops into the ocean, but even then, a skilled digital forensics specialist could likely recover what they need. Burning a device into a molten pile of plastic, however, tends to do the trick.

    Demirjian has done work for NASA, IBM, Harvard and MIT, police organizations, the Department of Transportation and more. And though he considers himself an expert in digital forensics, he says some government agencies have access to data recovery tools that even he doesn't have.

    That being the case, Demirjian said it's best to practice being "politically correct," if sending something questionable.

    "Don't write something that you're going to be sorry about later if someone brings it up to you," he said.
    Lots of things are stored In The Cloud~!! Just take a look at all those storage facilities, from GOOGLE TO APPLE, MS And many others as well. So much of any communications these days are kept for ever in all those Huge storage facilities all over the world.So much stuff is automatically stored in the iClouds it staggers the mind.

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