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Thread: A word to the wise

  1. #1
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    Default A word to the wise

    Hey folks,
    A word to the wise...

    Despite the highest input costs I've seen in my time doing this the yields on the crops are startlingly low.
    Mostly its a result of the weather, as here, we're experiencing a drought, with less than 3 inches of rain locally since April.
    The normal would be about ten inches, and this is compounded by weeks of record high, or near record temperatures, leaving the pastures mostly baked brown.

    Now y'all been hearing about the drought out west, but I'm in Kentucky, and its getting bad.
    So my advice is prepare.

    Cattlemen are gonna be selling and that will be a buying opportunity, followed by a shortage and severe price increase in Beef.
    I'll selling half my herd in the next weeks, as I can't make enough hay to feed through the winter.
    I may even need to start feeding out the hay I've got to keep the animals in condition for sale..
    This isn't gonna end well.

    https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/
    A warrior lives by acting, not by thinking about acting, nor by thinking about what he will think when he has finished acting.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    2,441

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HouseWolf View Post
    Hey folks,
    A word to the wise...

    Despite the highest input costs I've seen in my time doing this the yields on the crops are startlingly low.
    Mostly its a result of the weather, as here, we're experiencing a drought, with less than 3 inches of rain locally since April.
    The normal would be about ten inches, and this is compounded by weeks of record high, or near record temperatures, leaving the pastures mostly baked brown.

    Now y'all been hearing about the drought out west, but I'm in Kentucky, and its getting bad.
    So my advice is prepare.

    Cattlemen are gonna be selling and that will be a buying opportunity, followed by a shortage and severe price increase in Beef.
    I'll selling half my herd in the next weeks, as I can't make enough hay to feed through the winter.
    I may even need to start feeding out the hay I've got to keep the animals in condition for sale..
    This isn't gonna end well.

    https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/
    Been in overdrive readiness the last couple months, filling all gaps. Gonna have 3 more 575 propane tanks dropped and filled next week, maybe the week after. Guess I'll be about ready as I can be after that.

    Sorry about your hardships, brother. Damn.
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  3. #3
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    Default

    Appreciate the concern, but I'm far from alone in this...
    Most folks don't realize KY is the number one producer of beef east of the Mississippi.
    I'll get by. I've planned for the days we're entering.

    Wise move on the propane... Even Beelzebub is buying new propane tanks and getting them topped off..
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    You know he knows what's coming.
    A warrior lives by acting, not by thinking about acting, nor by thinking about what he will think when he has finished acting.

  4. #4
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    Dec 2013
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    Default

    side note: down here on da bayou, on the coast of La., one would expect that there wouid be fairly regular showers as the Gulf on the south and the Atachafalaya basin to the north. But not true. We're running about 8 in below normal rainfall so far. cane/soy/veggie crops are under stress and unless the hot weather pattern changes (supposed to start this week!) its gonna be a meager harvest in the fall. prep and pray, the end has arrived.

  5. #5
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    Default

    [QUOTE=consteacher1;2856943]side note: down here on da bayou, on the coast of La., one would expect that there wouid be fairly regular showers as the Gulf on the south and the Atachafalaya basin to the north. But not true. We're running about 8 in below normal rainfall so far. cane/soy/veggie crops are under stress and unless the hot weather pattern changes (supposed to start this week!) its gonna be a meager harvest in the fall. prep and pray, the end has arrived.[/QUOT

    Same here in FL panhandle. Expect some rainfall this coming week, but drought conditions for quite some time is what we have had.

  6. #6
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    NH is OK - if you want a little "good" news. Summer thus far has been very mild. Things are growing like crazy.

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  7. #7
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    we've had a very cold/wet spring; I lost part of my garden to a monsoon. Last week was the 1st with spring weather and today it will hit 90, hard on the weakened plants that barely survived June. The fear now is that all the plants will bolt!
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  8. #8
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    it's pretty much the same here in GA---hot and dry to very hot and very dry
    several local farmers put in pivot systems in the last 3 years --their crops look good but if it isn't irrigated it is pretty much brown
    there are many fields not planted here --mainly those that lack irrigation
    some are already feeding hay which is getting hard to find and expensive
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  9. #9
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    Pastures are suffering here. Grass crunches under your feet. One farmer in our area cut a 30 acre field and got 3 rolls of hay. Cattle men here are going to have to sell and when they do, the price they get will be through the floor. Of course, the lower prices won't be seen at the store.
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  10. #10
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    Update,

    Trees are turning yellow and dropping leaves. Apparently fall is here, on July 1.
    We totaled at 2.2 inches of rain in June, about the same as the 1.94 inches in May

    Drought is not unusual, locally, especially at the end of summer, August/ September.
    But I’ve never seen anything like this; Specifically not so early in the summer.

    Note the areas outlined in black on the map below.
    https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/
    A warrior lives by acting, not by thinking about acting, nor by thinking about what he will think when he has finished acting.

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