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Thread: H1N1 experience... interesting herbal discovery and REMEDIES!

  1. #31
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    Today, I went to the doctor (for sinus problems). I mentioned I had started vita. D3 to hopefully stave off the swine flu. He looked at me puzzled and said that would not
    help prevent swine flu. ????? He also advised me not to drink tea made w/ cayenne after I told him it helped my breathing more than an inhaler did. I sure wish I could be an expert at everything!!!!! Too many choices/opinions - life sure is confusing!!!

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by IcedCoffee View Post
    Today, I went to the doctor (for sinus problems). I mentioned I had started vita. D3 to hopefully stave off the swine flu. He looked at me puzzled and said that would not
    help prevent swine flu. ????? He also advised me not to drink tea made w/ cayenne after I told him it helped my breathing more than an inhaler did. I sure wish I could be an expert at everything!!!!! Too many choices/opinions - life sure is confusing!!!
    I think we'd all agree here that:

    1) Doctor's of medicine don't always know everything, most especially when it comes to holistic, home remedies, herbals and alternative medicine.

    2) If the tea with cayenne works for you, keep at it! No reason to stop just because a doctor tells you.

    3) He's right that the D3 may not prevent the Swine Flu if you come in direct contact with it, but it may certainly lessen the severity of it and/or shorten the duration if/when you DO get it.

    4) It's ignorant to poo-poo and ignore all possible remedies and preventions when it comes to this flu. Yes, we all need a certain level of discernment and knowledge for safety's purposes, there's no reason to ignore the natural cures if they work.

  3. #33
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    If the recipe for elderberry syrup calls for 7 cups of juice, does anyone know the quantity of dried elderberries one would need to purchase to make sure that one has enough to make 7 cups of juice? How much juice can one expect to extract from a pound of dried elderberries? (Sorry if this was already covered, I didn't see it anywhere).

  4. #34
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    A pound of dried elderberries is just about 4 cups. You need three "jars" of the reconstituted berries to get 7 cups of juice, and you put 1 cup in each jar.

    So a pound will make about 1 1/3 "recipe".

    Summerthyme

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jubilee on Earth View Post
    I think we'd all agree here that:

    1) Doctor's of medicine don't always know everything, most especially when it comes to holistic, home remedies, herbals and alternative medicine.

    2) If the tea with cayenne works for you, keep at it! No reason to stop just because a doctor tells you.

    3) He's right that the D3 may not prevent the Swine Flu if you come in direct contact with it, but it may certainly lessen the severity of it and/or shorten the duration if/when you DO get it.

    4) It's ignorant to poo-poo and ignore all possible remedies and preventions when it comes to this flu. Yes, we all need a certain level of discernment and knowledge for safety's purposes, there's no reason to ignore the natural cures if they work.

    Not to mention that if his patient is taking herbals and they are working, he is losing the kickbacks he gets for prescribing brand name prescriptions. Can't be having that now. How would he ever get those free tennis and golf tickets?


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  6. #36
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    My folks have sworn by Oxylife the food grade peroxide. I used it in April when starting a real bad chest cold. It helped me and allowed me to be able to breathe without taking an inhaler. You take 2 Tablespoons upon rising and then wait 15 min. to eat or drink. It is labeled Stalized Oxygen with collodal silver and aloe vera. A 16 oz bottle retails for about $9.00. You may find it in health food stores. Or else google the name. But, read your labels if you mix different products.

  7. #37
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    Summerthyme. Just the old friend I need to help with a possible herbal for the respiratory complications of this big bad flu bogie man/ crowd control vehicle/ national emergency of last resort stuff. Yea, yea, I know it's real, and am as interested now in the reports of neurological disorders showing up in survivors as any other aspect, because that might be an indicator, (or even a marker), of laboratory tinkering if not outright invention in a bio-warfare facility.

    I haven't really worked this out carefully, but thought I'd float it for the experts instead of bending my pea-sized dinosaur brain. We grow wormwood as one natural wormer for the goats, and as you must know, wormwood has some interesting properties. For example, it has been shown in actual studies to be as effective as the leading drugs used to treat malaria, including the new drug resistant strains.

    So let's brainstorm the pros and cons of using it for the respiratory aspects of this influenza strain, unless someone can show that idea is a non-starter for bio-chemical/ medical reasons. I'm not claiming to know.

    Thanks.

    Tras
    "They who have put out the people's eyes reproach them of their blindness."
    John Milton, 1642

  8. #38
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    Side issue, but could you share how you dose your goats? I've got goats, and I'm interested in natural dewormers. Can you use it with dogs?
    IF you are willing & obedient , you shall eat the good of the land: But if you refuse & rebel, You shall be devoured with the sword: for the mouth of the LORD hath spoken it. Isaiah 1:19, 20

  9. #39
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    Hi, Tras! SO glad to see you back and posting!

    Artemisia Annua, right? "Sweet Annie"? It's an interesting plant and has some valid uses, but I can't see any use for influenza, pneumonia or, in truth, any bacterial or viral disease. It's strengths are in parasites (and malaria is a parasitical infection of the blood), and possibly for some cancers. I haven't got any "proof", but there is simply nothing in the literature- anywhere- which would support it's use for influenza.

    An herb I believe would be very useful is Elecampane. I've seen it work amazingly on "heaves" in horses (which is more or less like emphysema in humans), and it's known as a lung "tonic", and for it's ability to help expel phlegm. Here's a brief snip for those wanting to know more- please follow up with your own research.

    http://www.herbs2000.com/herbs/herbs_elecampane.htm
    USES
    Chest infections - Elecampane has long been valued as a tonic herb for the respiratory system. Its warming effect on the lungs, combined with its ability to gently stimulate the coughing up and clearing of mucus from the chest, makes it a safe remedy for young and old. Elecampane can be used in almost all chesty conditions, and is very useful when the patient is debilitated.
    Chronic chest complaints - Elecampane's attributes have led to its specific use for chronic bronchitis and bronchial asthma. It is particularly useful because it both soothes the bronchial tube linings and is an expectorant. In addition, the herb is mildly bitter, helping recovery by improving digestion and the absorption of nutrients.
    Digestive problems - Elecampane has been taken traditionally as a tonic herb for the digestion. It stimulates the appetite and relieves dyspepsia. Elecampane is a useful remedy for the treatment of worms.
    Infection - In the past, elecampane was used in the treatment of tuberculosis. Elecampane combines well with other antiseptic herbs and is used for infections such as flu and tonsillitis. Its restorative, tonic action complements its ability to counter infection.
    Other medical uses - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease ( COPD ).
    I do think we've got the most important herbs/alternatives covered in several threads here. One I only briefly mentioned, from Tom McDowell in Montana, is Lomatium root. He sent me some, but we'd mostly recovered from the flu by then, so I can't swear it works from personal experience. However, he has an impressive body of literature on it- and the Indian tribes who used lomatium routinely had NO deaths in the 1918 pandemic which killed thousands of other Natives. Here's his store:

    http://stores.shop.ebay.com/Montana-Medicinals

    Just to briefly cover what we know works:

    Elderberry, lomatium root tincture and/or resveratrol- either from Pinot Noir wine, Japanese Knotweed extract, or a commercial supplement. Don't waste your time drinking "itadori tea" (Japanese Knotweed tea)- the resveratrol in JK is NOT water soluable. I've got a big batch of tincture brewing now... it IS soluable in alcohol at a rate of 50mgs/ml. All of these are known to keep the viral load low, which is probably the most important factor in surviving/keeping the disease relatively "mild".

    Anti-inflammatories, to keep the inflammatory cytokines from exploding. As mentioned in the first post of this thread, we've found nothing that works as well as curcumin. For folks who can't take that, ginger is an alternative. Licorice root is as well, but special care needs to be taken in people who have high blood pressure or adrenal issues. Omega-3 oils (Essential fatty acids) also are potentially useful.

    Elecampane (a root tea or tincture) and/or guaifsenian (Mucinex or it's equivalent) will help loosen phlegm and keep it from clogging the lungs. The elecampane seems to have additional value as a lung "toner"... horses with heaves don't have lungs clogged with mucous- they have lungs which don't work well to move air through them. It's probably best as a hot decoction (tea, simmered for 10 minutes) for flu. For longer term (say, the 2 months after you've mostly recovered, especially if the lungs were affected), 1/2 tsp tincture 2x a day wouldn't be a bad idea.

    There are other herbs known to help inflammation, BUT they often are "immune boosting" as well... avoid ginseng for sure, and possibly chamomile, although I suspect it's action is mild enough it would be safe. Obviously, herbs like echinacea (any herb which says it "boosts the immune system") should be avoided for THIS viral strain.

    Hope that helps.

    Summerthyme

    Edited to add:

    If it's NOT Artemisia Annua, but another artemisia you're referring to (the Annua variety is the only one I know of with the anti-malarial properties- this is one of the problems with using "common" names for herbs- there are so many which are similar, or even used for two very different plants), my answer would be the same. Great plants for parasites and possibly some other uses, but not for influenza. And SOME of the wormwood plants are quite dangerous in larger doses.
    Last edited by Summerthyme; 08-27-2009 at 08:54 AM. Reason: added information

  10. #40
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    I know most of you 'canners" are really busy right now, so I hope someone reads this! Do I need to use new lids each time for the elderberry syrup? Its not *really* canning, so I am wondering if I can reuse lids?

    Also, I've only worked with dried berries up till yesterday - and we discovered elderberry growing wild all over out here (and yes , it is the right thing!) But, I didn't really know what to do with fresh berries so I boiled them and then simmered for 20 -30 minutes to obtain the juice..... The first 2 batches of juice were lighter in color than the dried. I didn't know if I used too much water, or if there was a color varience in fresh vs. dried. But, I reduced the water on the next batch and the juice was back to the deep purple. So, I think I watered down the first few cups of juice excessively. Can it be salvaged? Or do I need to chuck it?

    Thanks as always for sharing your knowledge.

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